Would you turn down a job if you had to wear a suit or heels? | The Tylt

Would you turn down a job if you had to wear a suit or heels?

Many people say they could never wear a suit to work. Workplace dress codes have relaxed considerably, but some offices still enforce strict dress codes. Jobs in banking, insurance, politics, law, and sales may still require a two-piece suit (plus nylons and closed-toe heels if you're a woman). Older generations often see suits as a sign of a serious career, while younger folks point out that Steve Jobs never wore a suit. Would you say no to a job where you had to wear a suit? 👔 👠

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Would you turn down a job if you had to wear a suit or heels?
A festive crown for the winner
#OnlyDressForSuccess
#SayNoToSuits
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Would you turn down a job if you had to wear a suit or heels?
#OnlyDressForSuccess
#SayNoToSuits
#SayNoToSuits

Startup culture has altered the whole concept of what success at work looks like. This generation values authenticity and uniqueness, and there's nothing less individual than an uncomfortable workplace uniform.

Elite Daily wrote:

I want to enjoy my job, not resent it
If clothes are a representation of who we are, then I want to work for someone who lets me express myself. Uniforms and dress codes are a hold on self-expression.
#OnlyDressForSuccess

But many still subscribe to the old "dress for the job you want" ethos.

Fortune wrote: 

“It may seem superficial, but clothing makes a statement about who you are and where you want to go,” says Jacqueline Whitmore, an etiquette expert and author who heads up the Protocol School of Palm Beach. She often advises executives who want to polish their image. “Personal style has always played, and still plays, a crucial role in the career trajectories of leaders.”
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Would you turn down a job if you had to wear a suit or heels?
A festive crown for the winner
#OnlyDressForSuccess
#SayNoToSuits