Do you really wash your fruit and vegetables? | The Tylt

Do you really wash your fruit and vegetables?

It's a maxim passed on for generations: always wash your fruits and vegetables before you eat them. But for some, the effort of washing every single piece of produce is just too much. For those who have never gotten sickit's no harm, no foul. Others are horrified by the thought of skipping this crucial kitchen step. This camp says science is on their side when it comes to harmful bacteria that might be living on the peels of your fruits and veggies. Be honest, do you always wash your produce?

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Do you really wash your fruit and vegetables?
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#AlwaysWash
#ImSureItsFine
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Do you really wash your fruit and vegetables?
#AlwaysWash
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You know you've been there. That moment always comes where you're staring into the container of strawberries, wondering what would happen if you just took a bite without washing it first. 

Eventually, you work up the courage–just to see–you hesitantly take a bite, you chew, and nothing happens. You're still alive! Suddenly, your world is changed. You don't need to wash apples and you scoff at everyone who does. 

You are new, improved, and have saved precious time in the kitchen. Congratulations. 

#AlwaysWash

False. Washing your produce is an essential step. Produce holds lingering contaminants like dirt and insects. Men's Health Jordyn Taylor reports:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you wash your produce to avoid food-borne illnesses like norovirus, which is the country's leading cause of disease outbreaks from contaminated food. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and diarrhea.

Taylor himself admits he's a convert: he used to ignore the need to wash produce, but after researching, he's changed his ways. 

But I have to admit, part of me always suspected the mandate was a bit of a scam...Rinsing an innocent little onion to prevent disease? The more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a conspiracy theory perpetuated by Big Water.

He concludes:

Sorry, but your mom was right. While washing your produce won't protect you from every deadly food-borne illness, it has been shown to prevent some nasty things from getting inside your body. 
#ImSureItsFine

Listen, everyone takes daily risks. You risk sickness and injury every time you step out your door–even every time you turn on your stove. If you'd like to take a risk by abstaining from rinsing your fruit, so be it. Take Part's Linda Sharps explains to those who wash their produce religiously:

Which is to say, I'm sure you don't understand how a person could deliberately—and repeatedly—choose to not wash one's fruit. Well, for one thing, I can't lie: There's a laziness factor. But there's also a part of me that looks at what appears to be a perfectly clean, shiny apple and figures whatever microscopic thing that's clinging to its surface can't really be that hazardous.

Sharps hits the nail on the head; how can something so beautiful need to be cleaned?

#AlwaysWash

This is despicable. It takes no less than 10 seconds to wash a bowl of strawberries. Just do it. 

The National Health Services points out: 

Bacteria can get onto fruit and vegetables in several ways. They may be present in water used for irrigation, organic fertilisers, or droppings from birds and other animals that go into fields.

If you want to eat bird droppings for dinner, more power to you. Just don't invite guests over for dinner.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do you really wash your fruit and vegetables?
A festive crown for the winner
#AlwaysWash
#ImSureItsFine