Is Twitter justice morally right or just mob rule? | The Tylt

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Is Twitter justice morally right or just mob rule?
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#YaaasTwitterJustice
#StopTheTweetHunt

Twitter took cannabis business owner Alison Ettel to task after she called the police on an eight-year-old black girl for selling water. Critics think Ettel was racist, hypocritical, and harassing, and say she endangered the safety of a child. Dispensaries are pulling her products left and right, and many argue she deserves to be exposed and have her business ruined. But Ettel protests that she is not racist, regrets her actions, and maintains she is a victim of Twitter mob justice. What do you think? ⚖️📱⚖️

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Is Twitter justice morally right or just mob rule?
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Here's the original video that went viral. Ettel claimed the girl selling water didn't have a proper permit.

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People were even more incensed when they found out Ettel owns a cannabis business that makes products for pets (selling cannabis is still a federal crime). Many say as a business owner in California, she's reaping what she sowed.

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Ettel defended herself by saying she was only pretending to call the police, and "vehemently denies the issue had to do with race." 

“I have no problem with enterprising young women. I want to support that little girl. It was all the mother and just about being quiet,” she said.
The incident bears a striking similarity to one in April in which a white woman in Oakland called the police on a black family for attempting to set up a grill in a park. 
Ettel said she is now getting threats online and feels “discriminated against.”
“It was stupid,” she said. “I completely regret that I handled that so poorly. It was completely stress-related, and I should have never confronted her. That was a mistake, a complete mistake."
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The irony: it burns.

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Ettel may not have had the proper permits to run her weed business, which was extremely profitable.

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There has been a wave of publicized incidents in which white women call the cops on people of color for everyday activities. Perhaps losing her business is extreme punishment, but Ettel's behavior is part of a larger pattern that's also extreme and endangers people of color. People are fed up with these threatening calls. Actions have consequences.

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Critics say even if you abhor Ettel's behavior,  she didn't deserve to be doxed or receive death threats. They say it's disturbing how swiftly Twitter can unleash an angry mob.

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Ettel defended herself and her actions on Facebook, but has since had to shut down all of her social media accounts. Many dispensaries have said they will no longer carry her products. Cannabis community activists are calling for Ettel to be publicly rejected by the industry.

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Others say having your business and life ruined over a threatening phone call is too extreme.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Is Twitter justice morally right or just mob rule?
A festive crown for the winner
#YaaasTwitterJustice
#StopTheTweetHunt