Should we really live by the Ten Commandments? | The Tylt

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Should we really live by the Ten Commandments?
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In the Book of Exodus, God gives the Ten Commandments, carved on tablets of stone, to Moses on Mount Sinai after the Israelites flee Egypt. Many Christians argue the Ten Commandments aren't just good rules for living, but the basis of American laws. Like Judge Roy Moore, they want to display the commandments in our courts and schools. Others say such displays violate the separation of church and state—plus, most of the commandments aren't laws or even good ideas. What do you think? ⚖️ ✝️

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People who want the Ten Commitments on display say principles like don't steal, don't kill, honor your parents, don't covet other people's belongings, and don't take the name of Lord in vain are all important rules for morality.

When asked in a 2005 Gallup Poll if the Supreme Court should or should not allow the Commandments to be displayed on the grounds of the Texas state Capitol building, 76 percent of Americans said the display should be allowed—and only 21 percent said it should not.

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Writer and anti-theist activist Christopher Hitchens wrote a seminal piece on why the Ten Commandments make no sense in contemporary American life.

The Ten Commandments were derived from situational ethics. They show every symptom of having been man-made and improvised under pressure. They are addressed to a nomadic tribe whose main economy is primitive agriculture and whose wealth is sometimes counted in people as well as animals. They are also addressed to a group that has been promised the land and flocks of other people...whom God orders them to kill, rape, enslave, or exterminate. 
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Other critics ask why, in the top ten rules for morality, the commandments say nothing about slavery, rape, racism, or child abuse. It seems like those rules should be prioritized over not swearing or being polite to one's parents. George Carlin did a famous bit entitled "I have a problem with the Ten Commandments."

Here's how it happened: About five thousand years ago, a bunch of reli­gious and political hustlers got together to figure out how they could control people and keep them in line. They knew people were basically stupid and would believe anything they were told, so these guys announced that God— God personally—had given one of them a list of Ten Commandments that he wanted everyone to follow. They claimed the whole thing took place on a mountaintop, when no one else was around.
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But some Christians blame the lack of publicly posted commandments in schools for the epidemic of mass shootings.

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Even the Family Research Council bemoans the fact that while the majority of Americans may support the display of the Ten Commandments, they don't really know what the Ten Commandments actually are. Skeptics say if people realized that with exception of theft and murder, the Commandments do not include any laws, they might not be so enthusiastic about having them displayed.

Only 14% can accurately name all Ten Commandments. Yet 78% of Americans are in favor of public displays of the Commandments. How ironic. Americans affirm the Ten Commandments, but cannot name them.
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should we really live by the Ten Commandments?
#ObeyTheCommandments
A festive crown for the winner
#TheBibleIsntLaw