Is it a spork or a fopoon? | The Tylt

Is it a spork or a fopoon?

The world of cutlery welcomed the spork–a spoon-fork combination–as early as 1874, when the invention was patented. This pronged spoon is everyone's favorite utensil; it has everything you need right in one place. Where people disagree, is on what to call it. The 1970 trademark for this handy invention labels it a "spork," and most agree this title is correct. But some silverware enthusiasts refuse, saying the tool should be called a "fopoon" instead. Which is correct?

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Is it a spork or a fopoon?
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Samuel W. Francis patented the spork in 1874 as a combination of the spoon, fork and knife. The term "spork" was not trademarked until 1970, once the tool gained notoriety as a plastic utensil. Mental Floss reports:

 The plastic pronged spoon familiar to all cafeteria dwellers came around almost a century later. The word spork can be traced back to a dictionary entry from 1909, but a U.S. company didn’t trademark the name Spork until 1970. The plastic spork quickly became a staple utensil for schools, prisons, and fast food chains. 

The spoon, fork, and sometimes knife combo has been a "spork" since its earliest days. Therefore, this is what the tool should be called.

#TeamFopoon

Despite what history says, some say that "spork" is the incorrect term. A fork-spoon combo is, in fact, a "fopoon." Urban Dictionary defines "fopoon" as a:

Modified version of a fork and a spoon

For some, it just makes more sense. If you use the pronged spoon as a fork more often than you do a spoon, "fork" should take precedence in the utensil's title. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Is it a spork or a fopoon?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamSpork
#TeamFopoon