Which would you rather do: solve a Rubik's Cube or win a chess match? | The Tylt

Which would you rather do: solve a Rubik's Cube or win a chess match?

The Rubik's Cube turned 40 in 2020, and it's hard to imagine a world without it. From fiddling with this pesky puzzle during long car rides to full-fledged Rubik's competitions, the allure of the Rubik's cube is everlasting. That said, can anything compare with the feeling of victory that comes from winning at chess? Some say they prefer the steady patience of chess to the timed logic of the Cube. Which one is more fun?

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Which would you rather do: solve a Rubik's Cube or win a chess match?
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#TeamWinChess
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Which would you rather do: solve a Rubik's Cube or win a chess match?
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The Rubik's Cube is a toy for the masses. It's a logic puzzle that can keep you entertained for hours, or, depending on your proficiency, just seconds. As BBC's Jonathan Glancey wrote of the puzzle in 2014: 

...this innocuous, but brightly coloured, plastic cube has become as timeless in its own way as age-old board games like chess, backgammon and Go.

According to BBC, the first renditions of the Cube came from Hungarian artist and architect Ernő Rubik in 1974, who later became "the richest private individual in communist Hungary" after Ideal Toys took the puzzle to the world market in 1980. For the last 40 years, the Rubik's cube has continued to entertain all those who encounter it.

The Rubik's Cube may have a few great decades under its belt, but it's got nothing on the classic game of chess. Per Live Science, early forms of chess popped up in the 6th century in India. As HuffPost's Creston Davis writes, few games can compare: 

Chess combines logic with beauty, rigor with style and lets not forget my favorite part—psychology. 

Whether you're competing against a chess grandmaster or your little sister, chess is endlessly entertaining. As Davis writes, the game is a symphony of paradox, logic and history all wrapped into one: 

Among other things, what endear many to the game are the inherent paradoxes: the King is the most powerful piece on the board and yet it can only move one square at a time. The weakest piece, the pawn become increasingly powerful as the game matures past the opening and into and through the middle-game that can be exchanged for a Queen (or another capital piece) upon making it to the other side of the board. The Knight’s moves are uncanny and when moved with craft can trick a Queen into capture or else corner the King into checkmate. 
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Which would you rather do: solve a Rubik's Cube or win a chess match?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamRubiksCube
#TeamWinChess