Should you sneeze into your elbow or your hand? | The Tylt

Should you sneeze into your elbow or your hand?

Flu season is in full swing. Even though you arm yourself with hand sanitizer and Emergen-C, sometimes there's no stopping the snifflers and weezers around you. As the person coughing or sneezing, you are obligated to block your germs to the best of your ability. Some people believe sneezing into their hands is the right way to go. Others say sneezing into your hand is just as bad as sneezing without covering your mouth at all—sneezing into your elbow is the logical choice. What do you think?

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Should you sneeze into your elbow or your hand?
A festive crown for the winner
#ElbowSneeze
#HandSneeze
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Should you sneeze into your elbow or your hand?
#ElbowSneeze
#HandSneeze
#ElbowSneeze

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, everyone has an obligation to participate in "hygiene etiquette," a set of practices meant to prevent the spread of illness. When it comes to sneezing, the CDC is in the elbow camp. It instructs sneezers to: 

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
Put your used tissue in a waste basket.
If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.

Obviously, if you sneeze into your hand without a tissue, you will spread your germs as soon as you touch something.

#HandSneeze

Most kids are taught to sneeze into their hands rather than their arms. If you don't have a tissue, washing your hands after a sneeze is much easier than washing the inside of your elbow. If you sneeze into your elbow, those germs are sticking with you for the rest of the day. 

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#ElbowSneeze

The rules have changed, and it's past time for everyone to catch up–the heath of those around you is at stake! According to The New York Times's Daniel Victor: 

Germs are most commonly spread by the respiratory droplets emitted from sneezing and coughing. When they land on your hands, they’re transmitted to things like door knobs, elevator buttons and other surfaces the people around you are likely to also touch.
#HandSneeze

When asked "Why do people sneeze into their hands," on Reddit, one user responded: 

Because it takes less time to take your hand to your nose than your elbow, and sneezes happen VERY fast, sometimes you don't have time to think of other people getting your germs (they touch germs the whole time and most of them don't even care). 

Sometimes a sneeze just takes you by surprise! If Princess Charlotte can do it, so can everyone else. 

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FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should you sneeze into your elbow or your hand?
A festive crown for the winner
#ElbowSneeze
#HandSneeze