Should Snapchat streaks be banned? | The Tylt

Should Snapchat streaks be banned?

There are a number of things you have to do every day: brush your teeth, put on clothes and maintain your Snapstreaks. For many people, year-long Snapstreaks are a way of life. Even if you're not sharing substantive information with your friends every 24 hours, the streak itself has a life of its own, and it cannot be sacrificed for anything. Others worry that Snapstreaks encourage addictions to social media and should be banned outright. What do you think?

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Should Snapchat streaks be banned?
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Should Snapchat streaks be banned?
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Snapstreaks are the best way to keep up with your friends. There is no "losing track" or "drifting apart" with a solid streak in place. Once you get past 100 days, you're in it for the long haul; you and said friend will Snap at least once a day, everyday for as long as you desire.

Streaks serve as both a challenge—how long can you keep it going before someone messes up?—and a comforting reassurance from your friends. 

#DitchSnapstreaks

But it is the longevity of a Snapstreak that scares some regulators and parents. In a world with over 400-day streaks—where people will give friends their Snapchat login info so their streaks aren't lost when they're on a wifi-less vacation—many wonder whether the ability to create such a routine is furthering addiction to social media. 

Sen. Josh Hawley recently introduced a bill that would ban the Snapstreak feature from Snapchat entirely. Reuter's Bryan Pietsch reports: 

Snapchat was among the “most detrimental” social media networks to young people’s mental health in a 2017 study by the London-based Royal Society for Public Health.

Hawley's bill addresses social media addiction head-on, and it is of vital importance to the mental health of the entire country. 

#DitchSnapstreaks

Not only would a bill banning Snapstreaks be government overreach, but the idea also implies that Snapchat-users don't know what is best for them. Streaks demonstrate your relationship with other people, both at the streak's peak and once they disappear. New relationships feature a solid 60-day streak, putting an added marker on a two-month milestone. Similarly, break-ups mean a streak disappears, helping ease the constant heartbreak of seeing your ex's name pop up on your phone at every turn. 

 Streaks aren't dangerous; they are a from of communication. Dedication to maintain streaks speaks more to Snapchat's ability to identify its users' needs than to those users' mental health. 

#DitchSnapstreaks

By gamifying Streaks, Snapchat endangers its customers. Users may think they are in control of their streaks, but the despair that comes with losing a streak speaks to the power of the addiction itself. For Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge, this kind of regulation on UI gamification would be a welcome change. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should Snapchat streaks be banned?
A festive crown for the winner
#KeepSnapstreaks
#DitchSnapstreaks