Should kids believe in Santa Claus? | The Tylt

Should kids believe in Santa Claus?

Sleigh bells are ringing, holiday lights are flickering, and fruit cakes are a' baking. Clearly it's that holly jolly time of year–for some. Many parents are decking their halls and lining up in malls nationwide to get that cherished photo of their little one with 'ol St. Nick. But other families are questioning whether or not it's harmful to perpetuate the fantasy that is Santa Claus and are trying to debunk the man behind the myth. What do you think: Should kids believe in Santa Claus?

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Christmas without Santa Claus is like trying to pass off an Oreo without the creme filling—it's just not the same thing. While many families' beliefs—religious or otherwise—don't subscribe to the man in the red suit, for those who do partake, the myth of Santa Claus is an integral part of holiday tradition that also serves as a teaching tool extolling the virtues of being naughty or nice. For many, the most treasured Christmas memories involve the belief in  Santa Claus, and denying kids that idea of fantasy is taking away a bit of magic from their childhood. As Psychology Today author and Ph.D. Vanessa LoBue puts it, "fantasy in general is a normal and healthy part of child development."

Don't be a grinch and let your kids think what they will of Kris Kringle. 

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On the other hand, Santa Claus has been a controversial figure among parents and psychologists alike for decades. No matter how many ways you sugar-cookie coat it, the story is an utter fabrication, and many are overlooking that we're simply teaching children an outright lie. Some scientists have also pointed out the possible psychological effects on children once they come to the distressing realization that this fairy tale they've been spoon-fed for years isn't real. University of New England social scientist Kathy McKay states in an article in the Lancet psychiatry journal“Morally, making children believe in myths such as this has to be questioned."  

Tradition or not, a lie is a lie—and Santa Claus is no more likely to come down your chimney than the Easter Bunny or Tooth Fairy. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should kids believe in Santa Claus?
A festive crown for the winner
#SantaClausAMust
#SantaClausHarms
The Tylt is giving away 25 gifts in 25 days
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