Should firing squads replace lethal injection for death row inmates? | The Tylt

Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Should firing squads replace lethal injection for death row inmates?
#FiringSquadBetter
#LethalInjectionBetter
#FiringSquadBetter

Lethal injection has such a bad reputation that 75-year-old Alabama death row inmate Thomas D. Arthur petitioned to be executed via firing squad instead. The Supreme Court denied his request, but Justice Sonia Sotomayor issued what Five Thirty Eight called "a furious dissent:"

"Condemned prisoners, like Arthur, might find more dignity in an instantaneous death rather than prolonged torture on a medical gurney.”
imageSupportingMedia
#LethalInjectionBetter

But even Americans who support the death penalty are generally appalled by the idea of firing squads. Only 9 percent of Americans think it is the most humane method of execution.

“Americans tend to want the death penalty to be as sanitary as possible,” said Andrew Novak, a professor at George Mason University who studies the death penalty in the U.S. and abroad. “It’s an act of state violence, but we don’t want it to be violent.”
imageSupportingMedia
#FiringSquadBetter

Most of us think of lethal injection as simply putting people to sleep—but that's not the reality. Since trained doctors refuse to perform executions, inexperienced prison staff are left to administer drug procedures that normally require medical professionals. European pharmaceutical companies have stopped selling execution drugs to the United States, creating a shortage. So states have turned to drugs that have never been used before in executions, resulting in horrific scenes like those seen in Oklahoma.

#LethalInjectionBetter

But others argue it's simply a matter of acquiring the right drugs and then administering them effectively.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should firing squads replace lethal injection for death row inmates?
A festive crown for the winner
#FiringSquadBetter
#LethalInjectionBetter