Should fast food be healthier? | The Tylt

Should fast food be healthier?

Fast food is a treat afforded to well-behaved children and adults stumbling home at four o’clock in the morning. But it’s a “treat” specifically for the fact it’s not the greatest thing to ingest. Some argue those with lower incomes look to fast food as more affordable meals and shouldn’t be subjected to its fattening ingredients. Others declare fast food is supposed to be unhealthy—eat a salad if you want nutrition. Should fast food clean up its act? 

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Should fast food be healthier?
A festive crown for the winner
#MakeFastFoodHealthy
#KeepFastFoodGreasy
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Should fast food be healthier?
#MakeFastFoodHealthy
#KeepFastFoodGreasy
#MakeFastFoodHealthy

It’s no secret that fast food is bad for you. Each product is packed with high amounts of sodium and cholesterol as well as sugars and preservatives. A study on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) highlights that consistent consumption of fast food over time is directly linked to obesity and various other cardiovascular diseases. Not exactly the most recent or shocking news, but it remains concerning all the same.  

#MakeFastFoodHealthy

Even the “healthier” fast food menu options aren’t that great. One Business Insider writer, Kevin Reilly, detailed his experience eating nothing but “nutritious” fast food for a week. Although he admits he lost weight, he pointed out many of the low-calorie options were packed with salt that left him hungrier than before (just take a look at what those “Impossible” Burgers really are). For anyone wondering what eating nothing but non-healthy fast food items for a while looks like, Morgan Spurlock has you covered.

#MakeFastFoodHealthy

People can obviously avoid eating fast food. However, fast food consumption has previously been linked to socioeconomic status. A study on The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that low-income households have a greater tendency to choose poor dietary options due to their financial situation. Making fast food healthier would allow for disadvantaged people to lead healthier lives. 

#KeepFastFoodGreasy

Eating fast food is akin to watching reality TV—sometimes you just need the trash. Greatist details how a healthy lifestyle can still be maintained if you take an eighty-twenty approach: Eat clean for eighty percent of the time while the remaining twenty percent is dedicated to treating yourself. Healthline even states that a totally strict diet can do more harm than good. Everything in moderation is the way to go. 

#KeepFastFoodGreasy

Additionally, no one’s forcing you to eat fast food. If you’re strapped for time or cash, there are plenty of other healthier selections available. Women’s Health notes that food chains with “build-your-own” options—such as Chipotle—are always better options if you're on-the-go. Not to mention there are plenty of salad and healthy food bars to choose from. Otherwise, it may just be a matter of making time to go to the grocery store and being cognizant of what you’re putting into your cart. 

#KeepFastFoodGreasy

With regards to the socioeconomic argument, newer studies counter the information that fast food and financial status are related. Science Direct claims that a higher consumption of fast food has more to do with longer work hours and a lack of dietary awareness than socioeconomic status. As long as you know what you’re eating, bon appetit!  

In this episode of "Tell Me Everything," Registered Dietician Nutritionist Whitney Catalano discusses the impact socioeconomic status and marginalization can have on health outcomes, as well as how to build a healthy relationship with food at every size. Take a look below: 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should fast food be healthier?
A festive crown for the winner
#MakeFastFoodHealthy
#KeepFastFoodGreasy