Do you keep shoes on or off in the house? | The Tylt

Do you keep shoes on or off in the house?

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who take their shoes off before they step inside their house, and those who don't. Some think leaving shoes on indoors is an unimaginable crime. The bottom of your shoes have residue from everything on the street–dog poop, urine, dirt, and more–and you should never bring those germs inside. Others feel there's no problem with leaving your shoes on in the home. What's actually gross is walking around your house with smelly bare feet. What do you think?

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Do you keep shoes on or off in the house?
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Do you keep shoes on or off in the house?
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Plenty of people leave their shoes on in the house. After a long day, it's natural to walk inside, set your stuff down, and go about your business–there's no need to add taking your shoes off to the mix. Plus, according to Tonic, the soles of your shoes may be covered in "bacteria, viruses, germs, and parasites," but so is the rest of your house. 

Tonic's Elizabeth Brown looks to Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at the John Hopkins Center for Health Security and an expert on infectious diseases. for insight. According to Adalia, everyone needs to calm down about feeling the need to take their shoes off:

“Just taking off your shoes isn’t really going to substantially diminish that microbial load you have in your house—nor would you want it to—because a lot of times, 99 percent of the microorganisms on the planet don’t do any harm,” Adalja tells me. “I find that the general public is often hung up on this concern of keeping everything as sterile as possible, not realizing that the floors in your house are [already] teeming with microorganisms [such as] bacteria and viruses.”
#TakeShoesOff

For others, leaving shoes on in the house is unimaginable. Why would you track in all of that dirt and grime if you don't have to? The team at the "The TODAY Show" took a stab at settling this etiquette battle by bringing in Dr. Charles Gerba, a professor at the University of Arizona who studied the bacteria on the bottom of shoes specifically:

“If you wear shoes for more than a month, 93 percent will have fecal bacteria on the bottom of them,” he told TODAY Home about his findings. Gerba credited things like pet waste on the ground outside and splashes from the toilet on public restroom floors for this contamination.
“Shoes make microorganisms fairly mobile, and you’re tracking that all around (the house),” Gerba said, adding that the cracks on the bottoms of shoes make it more conducive for bacteria to hang around.

No one wants that kind of bacteria in their home. It's easier for everyone to just take your shoes off at the door. 

#KeepShoesOn

But some are grossed out not by the idea of bacteria on the bottom of their shoes, but by walking around barefoot in the home. After spending the whole day with socks and shoes on, no one wants to smell your feet once they are freed from their bounds. 

We all know smelly feet are a particular brand of awful, and the smell lingers. Keep your shoes on. 

#TakeShoesOff

Others say there is no excuse. If walking around barefoot gives you pause, purchase some cozy slippers and your problem will be solved. Keeping your shoes on in the house is gross and inexcusable.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do you keep shoes on or off in the house?
#KeepShoesOn
A festive crown for the winner
#TakeShoesOff