Would you return money you found on the street? | The Tylt

Would you return money you found on the street?

It's one thing to find pennies and dimes on the street—moments for good luck rather than an addition to your personal savings—but what happens when you see a crumpled $20 bill? If, say, you stumble across thousands of dollars being spilled on the highway, do you stop and collect or drive by? Many people recently demonstrated the belief that collecting money on the street is morally acceptable on one Atlanta highway. But others say you should never take what isn't yours; money should always be returned. Do you stop and collect or carry on?

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Would you return money you found on the street?
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If you find cash on the street, the bills immediately have a new owner: you. Whoever had a hole in their pocket is long gone, and their misfortune is now your lucky day. Whether it's $10 or $1,000, the principle does not change. 

A group of afternoon commuters demonstrated this mindset in early July, when cars in Atlanta came to a screeching halt to collect cash falling from an armored truck. According to the New York Times' Christine Hauser

About $175,000 in bills spilled out and were carried away by the wind over a section of Interstate 285, which encircles Atlanta, the police said. The bills scattered to the shoulder of the six-lane westbound section of the highway. 
More than a dozen commuters screeched to a halt or veered off to the shoulder of the highway near the Dunwoody Road exits, the police said. They scooped up bills from the pavement and returned to their vehicles with fistfuls, and sometimes armloads, of cash.

It's not the commuters' fault the armored truck's door flew open, and there is certainly no way to return cash to a moving vehicle. Cash on the street—or the highway—is fair game.

#AlwaysReturnMoney

Money found on the street absolutely does not belong to the person who finds it. There's nothing worse than the panic of losing hard-earned cash, and the upstanding thing to do is to return said cash, ending the owner's anxiety. The Times spoke with one such good samaritan after the Atlanta highway debacle, Randrell Lewis.

Within minutes, Mr. Lewis said, he had snatched up about $2,000 in singles, fifties and hundreds. He returned $2,094 on Wednesday, the police said.

Per the Dunwoody police department, failing to return cash found on the street is not only unethical, it's stealing.

“Heads up Dunwoody, it’s cloudy with a chance of cash,” the department said on Facebook, adding, “While we certainly understand the temptation, it’s still theft and the money should be returned.”

And according to others, returning cash found on the street could still work out in your favor:

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Would you return money you found on the street?
#AlwaysReturnMoney
A festive crown for the winner
#KeepThatMoney