Which generation is better at relationships: Millennials or Baby Boomers? | The Tylt

Which generation is better at relationships: Millennials or Baby Boomers?

It's an old adage: 50 percent of marriages end in divorce. But according to a new study, divorce rates in the U.S. dropped 18 percent between 2008 and 2016, and millennials are the driving force behind the change. Despite the increasing public acceptance of divorce, millennials seem to be turning away from the option. Even so, baby boomers, a generation plagued by divorce, continue to chastise younger generations for steering away from tradition. Could millennials actually be better at relationships?

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A new study (yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal) reports that divorce rates are dropping among millennials. This is the same generation known for being "lazy, narcissistic and prone to jump from job to job," as reported by LifeScience.com. Millennials may be antsy when it comes to jobs, but it seems this quality does not translate to their relationships. 

USA Today reports on the new study conducted by University of Maryland professor Philip Cohen, highlighting that:  

...newly married women are now 'more likely to be in their first marriages, more likely to have BA degrees or higher education, less likely to be under age 25, and less likely to have own children in the household,' which Cohen writes can all affect the risk of divorce.
Couples are waiting until they're more economically stable to marry.

These factors are likely to result in declining divorce rates across the board. 

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Baby boomers, on the other hand, have roughly doubled their divorce rate since the 1990s. According to Pew Research's Renee Stepler, the climbing divorce rates among baby boomers is due in part to their aging. She says:

During their young adulthood, Baby Boomers had unprecedented levels of divorce. Their marital instability earlier in life is contributing to the rising divorce rate among adults ages 50 and older today, since remarriages tend to be less stable than first marriages.

On top of this, now that baby boomers are reaching the later stages of life, there are more reasons to divorce even if couples did not have the early-onset marital problems typical of their generation. According to Market Watch's Angela Moore:

Statistically speaking we’re healthier and probably going to be living a lot longer — possibly 30 years longer — than average retirees once did. The surge in late-in-life — or “gray” — divorce is one possibly unintended consequence of this so-called longevity bonus.
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It's important to keep in mind that the odds may be stacked against baby boomers when it comes comparing divorce rates among generations. As the senior generation, those who have been divorced are more likely to get married again, and the divorce rate for second marriages is even higher than for the first. Pew Research points out: 

The risk of divorce for adults ages 50 and older is also higher among those who have been married for a shorter time. 

Millennials might face similar increases in divorce rates a few decades down the line. The fact is, baby boomers have a longer record to track, making the comparison between the two generations somewhat unfair. 

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When it comes to marriage, millennials are known for being more open to a number of factors that likely contribute to the health of a relationship. Business Insider's Shana Lebowitz reports that millennials are more likely to have sex and live together with their partner before actually getting married. Millennials are also more open to partners of different religions. 

But engaging in long-term, serious relationships without the official marriage title might result in the same fate as those in the "gray divorce" group. This trend among baby boomers indicates that in an age where divorce is socially acceptable, most relationships have an expiration date. Millennials aren't better at relationships; they've just had less time to be in them. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Which generation is better at relationships: Millennials or Baby Boomers?
#MillennialsKnowLove
A festive crown for the winner
#LoveHardAtAnyAge