Should you squat or sit on public toilets? | The Tylt

Should you squat or sit on public toilets?

Picture this: you're at the mall scrambling to get your Christmas shopping done, sipping on a venti peppermint mocha, and, suddenly, you have to pee. Once safely in the nearest stall, you're faced with a choice—give your feet a break and sit on a public restroom toilet, or get a quick quad workout by squatting. Some say sitting on toilets is natural, while others are horrified by the idea of sitting where so many other butts have done the same. Which way is correct? 

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Sitting on a public toilet is disgusting. Think of all of the butts that have graced that porcelain throne before you. By sitting down, you're not only exposing yourself to a host of germs, but you're sitting in other patron's urine. Disgusting. 

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There is nothing wrong with sitting down on a toilet no matter where you are. The germ debate is largely based on paranoia anyway. According to Broadly's Maria Yagoda:

'In most public restroom surfaces, human-associated bacteria dominate,' says Dr. Nilka Figueroa, an Infectious Diseases Chief Fellow at Harlem Hospital Center. 'This bacteria are skin microbes that most people already have, so they pose almost no risk of infection.'
Studies consistently back up the no-big-dealness of sitting bare butt on a toilet seat. In 2016, a Filtrated study found that even gym equipment has more bacteria than toilet surfaces.
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The toilet seat is a cesspool of germs. Although WebMD cautions readers from becoming too paranoid, check out the list of diseases the WebMD experts list as fellow public restroom guests:

Yes, there can be plenty of bugs lying in wait in public restrooms, including both familiar and unfamiliar suspects like streptococcus, staphylococcus, E. coli and shigella bacteria, hepatitis A virus, the common cold virus, and various sexually transmitted organisms.

For many out there, you've known from day one that your cheeks were never touching that seat. It's also common courtesy to save others from your own germs! No matter how tired you are, nothing excuses sitting down on a public toilet. 

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Common courtesy? The toilet-seat squatters are the ones responsible for creating the pee-splatter! If everyone took a seat, there would be no droplets to avoid. Think about it, do you have this problem at home? No–because you sit down like every reasonable human should.

Plus, squatting is just difficult. When you're out and about and need to use the restroom, getting to sit down is one of the most underrated moments of relief. Rest those soles, knees, and muscles, and sit down without guilt. Express's Katrina Turrill points out the physical toll that repeated squatting can take on the body:

...according to women’s health physical therapist Brianne Grogan, women who don’t sit on the toilet properly should stop this habit immediately.
She told Sun Online: 'The problem with "hovering" over the toilet when urinating is that the muscles of your pelvic floor and pelvic girdle–your hip rotators, gluten, back and abs–are extremely tense.'
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Should you squat or sit on public toilets?
A festive crown for the winner
#SitYourBootyDown
#SquatItOrHoldIt