Is there such a thing as oversharing on social media? | The Tylt

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Is there such a thing as oversharing on social media?
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#CanNeverShareTooMuch
#TooMuchSharing

You know oversharing when you see it. Whether someone is yet again sharing a detailed story of their child's day at school, outlining their full political beliefs, or talking about their recent breakup, there are certain things many people would rather not see on their Twitter, Instagram and Facebook feeds. 

As The Odyssey's Allyson Charleston puts it: 

Probably the only time that it is socially acceptable or just plain welcomed to share extensive details about your private life is when you are in the company of those close friends. Per Twitter user, on average, they will have 208 followers. Instagram is 265. Do not share with 300 people that your significant other just cheated on you and left you for someone else. Save those conversations for your close friends.
#CanNeverShareTooMuch

But as psychologist Paula Durlofsky writes for Psych Central: 

Paying attention to the ways in which we interact online, what we share, and the quality of our virtual relationships is important, as they have a real impact on our lives and mental health. Sharing the ups and downs of our lives with close friends and family is the glue that binds our relationships and what makes them strong. 

For some, social media is the best strategy for reaching close family and friends spread out across the world. Even if someone in their network didn't need to know certain information about another's personal life, other followers in their circle might. 

According to Durlofsky, as long as you refrain from things like posting when you are extremely emotional, are protecting your privacy, and you keep track of how often you use social media overall, you should feel comfortable sharing whatever you want.

#TooMuchSharing

Others point to privacy concerns when it comes to oversharing. Anyone with a social media profile has already signed away some amount of personal data to advertisers, and there's no need to expose your personal life further by explaining your every move to Twitter followers. To some, if you're at all worried about protecting your privacy, it only makes sense to limit what you share when posting:

#CanNeverShareTooMuch

Sure, maybe there are some details that not everyone needs to know. But everyone is prone to oversharing—whether it be in person or on social media—at one point or another. No matter how wide or deep your community is, it should be supportive of you no matter what. As some point out, "we're all in this together."

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Is there such a thing as oversharing on social media?
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#TooMuchSharing
#CanNeverShareTooMuch