Is it okay to celebrate Christmas if you're not religious or a Christian? | The Tylt

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Is it okay to celebrate Christmas if you're not religious or a Christian?
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Some conservative Christians believe that a non-Christian celebration of Christmas is an example of cultural appropriation. This group believes that a secular Christmas both ignores the holiday's origins and dilutes its religious significance.

As The Federalist's Holly Scheer puts it:

What I can’t get behind is completely removing the religious overtones of Christmas, and even stripping all traces of the historical [Saint Nicholas] himself from the season.
We’re at an uneasy point where culture sees the change of the seasons and craves a ritual and something to celebrate but often wants to wash away anything Christo-centric from those very same celebrations. 
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Yet, other Christians argue that welcoming everyone into the Christmas spirit is an example of Christ-like behavior. Reverend Erin Wathen, the Senior Pastor at Foothills Christian Church, writes on Patheos.com:

...When I hear ‘keep Christ in Christmas,' what it sounds like to me is keeping for ourselves. Not the best celebration of God’s love incarnate.
We might often feel that the secularization of our favorite holiday has deprived it of all meaning. But on the contrary, Christmas is the time when many who would qualify themselves as ‘non-believers,’ feel a stirring of the spirit that leads them seeking. If we are truly disciples of Jesus, we should celebrate any element of the season that urges people toward the holy... When you get right down to it, the best way to 'keep Christ in Christmas' is to model Christlike behavior. Jesus was for feeding people. Jesus was for healing and compassion. Jesus was for getting a bunch of loud, messy, mismatched people around a table and having a big dinner. Not a moment of his life did he spend trying to get his name up on a sign.
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But for many, the secular celebration of Christmas has led to the increased commercialization of the holiday, leading to an increased focus on materialism than on religious significance. 

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Christmas as we know it takes practices from pagan celebrations of the winter solstice and applies them to the birth of Christ. Scripture also holds no indication that Jesus was even born on Dec. 25. According to the United Church of God:

History convincingly shows that December 25 was popularized as the date for Christmas, not because Christ was born on that day but because it was already popular in pagan religious celebrations as the birthday of the sun.

The Puritans who came to America in the 1620s chose to not celebrate Christmas for these reasons. According to The Week:

The upper classes in ancient Rome celebrated Dec. 25 as the birthday of the sun god Mithra. The date fell right in the middle of Saturnalia, a monthlong holiday dedicated to food, drink, and revelry, and Pope Julius I is said to have chosen that day to celebrate Christ's birth as a way of co-opting the pagan rituals. Beyond that, the Puritans considered it historically inaccurate to place the Messiah's arrival on Dec. 25. They thought Jesus had been born sometime in September.
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Is it okay to celebrate Christmas if you're not religious or a Christian?
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