Better New Year's resolution: Eating healthier or exercising more? | The Tylt

Better New Year's resolution: Eating healthier or exercising more?

It's 2019, the gyms are crowded and the salad bar lines are long. Eating healthier and exercising more are the top two resolutions for 2019 (followed by just simply "losing weight"). Research proves that a healthier diet will fast-track weight loss more than increased exercise, but many people would rather hit the gym, saying exercise makes them feel more in control of their body. Which resolution are you choosing?

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Better New Year's resolution: Eating healthier or exercising more?
A festive crown for the winner
#NewYearNewFood
#NewYearNewGym
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Better New Year's resolution: Eating healthier or exercising more?
#NewYearNewFood
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#NewYearNewGym

Gyms are notoriously crowded during the month of January. Everyone is in search of the same thing: a healthier, stronger body. 

Making a resolution to exercise more will lead to a happier lifestyle–it can even help fight mild depression. Regardless of whether or not you're ready to hit the beach with washboard abs, exercise will lead to increased lifespan, helping with everything from brain health to blood pressure

According to Business Insider, exercise can act as a "wonder drug" both physically and mentally:

Along with fixing your sleep, little else will have as transformative an effect on your life as working out.
Exercise can improve your heart health, up your sex drive, improve your sleep, and boost your mood. Research has also shown that working out may help keep the brain young, improve memory, and fight cognitive impairment.

What could be better than that?

#NewYearNewFood

If you're on a journey to lose weight, eating healthier is a much better choice than hitting the gym, as your diet is much more important than how often you exercise. CNN's Ben Tinker challenges readers: 

Think of it like this: All of your 'calories in' come from the food you eat and the beverages you drink, but only a portion of your 'calories out' are lost through exercise.

According to Alexxai Kravitz, an investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases:

'The average person–professional athletes excluded–burns 5% to 15% of their daily calories through exercise,' he said. 'It's not nothing, but it's not nearly equal to food intake, which accounts for 100% of the energy intake of the body.'
Even a vigorous cycling class, which can burn more than 700 calories, can be completely canceled out with just a few mixed drinks or a piece of cake.

The effort you put in at the gym won't mean anything if it's not supplemented by healthy eating. If you're on the track to lose weight, addressing your diet first will likely lead to greater success.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Better New Year's resolution: Eating healthier or exercising more?
A festive crown for the winner
#NewYearNewFood
#NewYearNewGym