Do you believe in the Loch Ness Monster? | The Tylt

Do you believe in the Loch Ness Monster?

The Loch Ness Monster has captivated the people of Scotland for more than a millennium.  Now, some say the time for speculation and skeptical sightings is over; it's time to find Nessie. A new Facebook event is inviting tens of thousands of participants to storm Loch Ness to get to the bottom (literally) of the mystery. Still, scientists say they've yet to find any proof that Nessie exists. Do you believe?

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Move over, Area 51, another Facebook event is galvanizing tens of thousands of people to "storm" their way to certainty. Per the BBC: 

On Facebook, about 18,000 people say they are going to a Storm Loch Ness event with 38,000 "interested".

The world is ready to discover, once and for all, whether this dinosaur-like sea creature truly resides in the depths of Loch Ness. According to PBS, the earliest written reference to a creature lurking in Loch Ness occurred in 565 A.D. in a biography of Saint Columba:

In A.D. 565, according to this account, Columba was on his way to visit a Pictish king when he stopped along the shore of Loch Ness. Seeing a large beast about to attack a man who was swimming in the lake, Columba raised his hand, invoking the name of God and commanding the monster to "go back with all speed." The beast complied, and the swimmer was saved.

The modern version of the tale picks up in 1933 when a local couple's sighting of the monster was detailed in the "Inverness Courier." Public interest in the aquatic monster has mounted ever since. 

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Not only would this mock mission to find Nessie be incredibly dangerous (per the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, the waters of Loch Ness can feature 13 foot-waves and depths more than twice the size of Big Ben), but scientists also agree the monster's existence is unlikely. Vox's Phil Edwards refers to author, paleontologist and geologist Donald R. Prothero on the topic: 

"The bigger issue," Prothero says, "is that the biological, geological, and physical evidence is against the thing existing."
As the Nessie myth developed, many cryptozoologists promoted the theory that it was a surviving plesiosaur — a marine reptile that swam in the water and that's believed to have been extinct for 65 million years....The flat floor of the lake would be ideal for finding bones, but no one has discovered them. Sonar scans of the lake have also failed to turn up Nessie fossils.
If Nessie did exist, it would appear to be the first and only of its kind. For a lot of reasons, that's unlikely.

The legend of the Loch Ness Monster, although not completely disproven, is implausible. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do you believe in the Loch Ness Monster?
A festive crown for the winner
#NessieIsReal
#NessieNotReal