What should you give up for Lent: Single-use plastics or social media? | The Tylt

What should you give up for Lent: Single-use plastics or social media?

For Christians, the Lenten season is one of fasting. For 40 days, Christians "give up" something in order to simulate Jesus's sacrifice when he was withdrawn in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights. In 2018, social media was one of the top habits Christians chose to forgo, saying the mental break provides further time for reflection. But some are taking a new strategy this year and choosing to forgo single-use plastics in order to help the environment. If you observe Lent, which are you choosing?

FINAL RESULTS
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What should you give up for Lent: Single-use plastics or social media?
A festive crown for the winner
#GiveUpPlastics
#GiveUpSocialMedia
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What should you give up for Lent: Single-use plastics or social media?
#GiveUpPlastics
#GiveUpSocialMedia
#GiveUpSocialMedia

Lent is all about filling your life with more prayer and reflection. The idea is that when you desire the habit you've given up, you turn to God instead.

According to Social Media Today, teens spend up to nine hours per day on social media. That's a lot of time to re-devote to reflection. One teen explained why he was giving up social media for Lent in 2018 via Life Teen. He explains: 

This Lent I want to stop plugging into the digital world before first connecting into my relationship with God. 
It’s time to stop looking down and start looking up. I want to appreciate someone’s presence by sharing my own presence.
#GiveUpPlastics

Priests often advise against giving up luxuries like soda or chocolate for Lent (the Lenten season isn't made to help with dieting, after all), and social media could be considered one of those easy-to-forgo luxuries. Instead, some are encouraging Christians to give up single-use plastics. 

These are items we use daily–plastic baggies, grocery bags, straws, Starbucks cups–and usually don't think twice about it. Giving up single-use plastics would be a lifestyle change for most, making it a true sacrifice–one that would certainly require more than a little prayer. 

The Washington Post's Sarah Pulliam Bailey spoke with Rev. Sarah Rossing, who encouraged her parish to give up a different plastic item each week during Lent:  

“It’s a way to think about it as more than just a personal thing, like chocolate or alcohol that’s enjoyable,” Rossing said. “This is asking people to give up convenience … and be more intentional with things and the Earth.”
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
What should you give up for Lent: Single-use plastics or social media?
A festive crown for the winner
#GiveUpPlastics
#GiveUpSocialMedia