Would you eat 'impossible' fish? | The Tylt

Would you eat 'impossible' fish?

The masterminds behind the “impossible” burger are getting fishy. After the release of its popular meatless beef products, Impossible Foods is looking to release plant-based fish options. Some are excited for the upcoming food's beneficial environmental impact, while others remain skeptical. Would you take a bite?

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Eating fish may not have the same health concerns as eating certain types of meat, but the appeal of the impossible fish instead lies in its potential environmental benefits. Eater reminds readers that ninety percent of the world’s fish population is completely depleted. As National Geographic quips, there are not plenty of fish in the sea after all. 

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Culinary-wise, fishless fish is another vegan option foodies can enjoy. As the New York Post highlights, the Impossible Food team is concentrating on the product’s taste. The company is currently experimenting with a plant-based and anchovy-flavored broth. Both ingredients are then paired with heme, the genetically modified yeast already included in the incredibly-popular Impossible Burger. Impossible fish is just one other step towards Impossible Food’s goal of replacing all animal-based foods by 2035.  

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Members of the public are openly questioning the quality of Impossible Foods. Dietitians and food-lovers alike have pointed to the amount of sodium and fats found in the Impossible Burger, and others question the health implications of ingesting something “genetically engineered." Imagine replacing something from the sea with something grown in a Petri dish.

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As many others have stated, just because a food is plant-based doesn’t mean it’s good for you. There are other ways of saving the ocean; eating a fish that’s actually a salty bean doesn’t have to be one of them. If a food alternative is grown in a lab, maybe it’s better to stick with the natural options. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Would you eat 'impossible' fish?
#ImpossibleFishPlz
A festive crown for the winner
#RegularFishPlz