Should you film the birth of your child? | The Tylt

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Should you film the birth of your child?
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For some, the birth of a child is something to be witnessed over and over again. Birth is a miracle after all, and for parents, photos and videos from the delivery are prized possessions. The Guardian's Rachel Holmes holds no false notions of having a beautiful video where she is featured as a slightly flushed, glistening new mother. She recalls the birth of her first child: 

If someone had taken photos of me during labour they would have come away with snaps of whey-faced exhaustion, interspersed with increasingly tortured gurning. Never mind reclining in a hospital bed, instead envision me squatting, naked and ungainly, next to a toilet bowl. 

Holmes refused photos in the moments after her daughter's birth because she was so exhausted–a decision she now regrets. Holmes says that although no one was ready with a camera the first time around, she hopes to film the birth of her next child. 

Understand that I don't necessarily want nice, pretty pictures to share on Facebook or Twitter. I don't want the black-and-white, sanitised version of birth. I want the glorious, gruesome, Technicolor version of what my body went through and what I achieved. As a marathon runner might. I want to see the pain, and also the pay-off at the end.
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But for some, the birth of your child is so precious that it shouldn't be shared with anyone else. Childbirth is incredibly personal, and there's a difference between showing a few pictures to friends and family and filming the entire delivery process. 

Some hospitals have even banned photography and filming in delivery rooms as a precaution for newborns. The New York Times's Katharine Q. Seelye spoke with Massachusetts General Hospital obstetrician and Harvard Medical School professor Dr. Erin E. Tracy on the subject:

'When we had people videotaping, it got to be a bit of a media circus,' Dr. Tracy said, adding that the banning of cameras evolved through general practice rather than a written policy. 'I want to be 100 percent focused on the medical care, and in this litigious atmosphere, where ads are on TV every 30 seconds about suing, it makes physicians gun-shy.'

If filming your child's birth gets in the doctors and nurses' way, there's no question the practice should be done away with. Plus, many people believe that your kid's first moments in the world are not meant for your Facebook timeline. Just enjoy the moment! 

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Should you film the birth of your child?
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