Facial rollers: Legit or a scam? | The Tylt

Facial rollers: Legit or a scam?

Over the last few years, facial rollers have received much fanfare for their skin-smoothing, blood-circulating abilities. The tools are typically made out of jade or quartz, and according to some, first made their debut in 17th century China. Users roll the stones over their skin morning and night, which is said to diminish the appearance of wrinkles and puffiness in the skin. But some say these pieces are all looks and no substance—a daily facial massage might feel good, but it's not actually doing much for your skin. What do you think?

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Facial rollers are simple enough to understand. As the L.A. Times' Ellen Thomas explains: 

The actual tool is essentially a tiny rolling pin made of jade stone, designed to be swept across the face for a cooling sensation and anti-inflammatory, lymph-draining effect. Its origin story is vague, but most brands that sell the roller concur that it has been used in Chinese beauty rituals for centuries.

Per Marie Claire, a number of beauty editors sing facial rollers' praises, saying they can do everything from decreasing dark circles to reducing tension headaches. Marie Claire's Maya Allen also spoke to dermatologist Melissa Kanchanapoomi Levin about the tools:

“Jade rolling may increase some level of lymphatic drainage in the face, which can temporarily reduce swelling,” says Dr. Levin. If you’re planning to try jade rolling, the process is simple: Apply a few drops of moisturizer, serum, or oil to your clean, dry face, then gently roll the jade up, down, and all across your skin until the product is absorbed.
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But can rolling a stone across your skin really do that much? Many a skeptic call facial rollers a waste of money. The Washington Post's Elizabeth Kiefer refers to dermatologist Suzanne Friedler, who says facial rollers are a slightly less-effective version of a facial massage. Sure, they increase circulation, but they don't perform miracles: 

“...if you’re looking for substantive change, that’s not going to happen with the jade roller. It’s also not going to have an effect on inflammatory conditions like eczema or psoriasis.”

Furthermore, if you don't use the roller correctly, it can do more harm than good: 

Susan Bard, a dermatologist with Manhattan Dermatology Specialists, says that people need to be wary about the potential for jade rollers to transmit bacteria — if you’re not disinfecting your roller, you may wind up doing more harm than good — and about overly aggressive usage. 
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Culture
Facial rollers: Legit or a scam?
#LoveFacialRollers
A festive crown for the winner
#HateFacialRollers