Best diet for 2019: Atkins or Weight Watchers? | The Tylt

Best diet for 2019: Atkins or Weight Watchers?

Both of these diet programs have been around for years. The Atkins Diet was developed by a cardiologist, who recommended patients limit their sugar and carb intake. This evolved into a full-fledged diet program that led to significant weight loss for many. Proponents say the diet also changed their body composition. Weight Watchers, now known as just "WW," is a point-based diet. The WW community loves that they can eat and track their favorite foods without guilt. Which diet are you choosing?

FINAL RESULTS
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Best diet for 2019: Atkins or Weight Watchers?
#GoAtkinsDiet
A festive crown for the winner
#GoWeightWatchers
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Best diet for 2019: Atkins or Weight Watchers?
#GoAtkinsDiet
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A new year means new goals, and The Tylt is here to help you on your journey! There are tons of diets out there, and it's hard to know which one is right for you. Follow along on our quest to name the best diet for 2019 and discover each diet's pros, cons, and possibilities. No matter which one you try, any effort to create a more healthy lifestyle is an admirable one. Vote below for the diet you'll be following this year:

#GoAtkinsDiet

The Atkins Diet was first developed by cardiologist Dr. Robert Atkins in the 1970s. Although the diet has evolved over the years, the core principle remains the same; the Atkins Diet:

...limits carbohydrates (sugar), so the body burns fat, including body fat, for fuel. This approach leaves the body steadily fueled, and weight is lost, even when more calories are being consumed. Steady fueling also means more constant energy levels all day long, and less hunger and cravings! You can actually lose weight while feeling full! 

Atkins dieters engage in four phases where they begin by almost entirely eliminating carbs from their diet and slowly adding them back in based on their weight loss and goals. Proponents of the diet say it allows them to still eat heartily and leads to significant weight loss. According to Very Well Fit's Jennifer Scott: 

Many people have lost a lot of weight on this plan. Some Atkins dieters lose 80 pounds or more on the plan. 
#GoAtkinsDiet

An Atkins dieter replaces sugars, grains, starches and high-carb fruits and vegetables with meats, low-carb veggies, and full-fat dairy. Dieters claim that in addition to weight loss, they experience a healthier lifestyle and improved body composition. Research also shows that low-carb diets can help manage pre-diabetes and diabetes.

For one dieter, this management was the ultimate prize. After trying the Atkins Diet, Women's Health writer, Amy Sowder, reported losing inches off her waist, plus:

The real prize? The amazing results from my recent physical exam at the doctor’s office. More than a year after my scary pre-diabetic and iron-deficient lab results and deep into these low-carb diets, my doctor, Fedir Ilnitskyy, M.D., walked into the patient room with a file folder, a smile, and said, “You earned an A this time.”
The numbers don’t lie. My blood sugar levels had plummeted from a dangerously high level to the lower end of the healthy range. My cholesterol remained healthy and was unaffected by all the extra fat I was eating.
#GoWeightWatchers

Weight Watchers was founded in the 1960s in the hopes of helping dieters actually establish life-long healthy habits. The program is now known as simply "WW" and has grown significantly since its humble beginnings. Now, WW has no shortage of celebrity endorsements (Oprah and Jennifer Hudson, to name a few) and has a massive online and in-person community built around it.

The key tenant of WW is to "eat what you want." The official WW website makes three promises to new dieters who are looking to take on "healthy habits for real life":

Eat what you love.
Discover total wellness.
Join the community.

The diet works on a point system–made far easier by apps and technology. Different foods have varying point values, and dieters track what they eat until they have fulfilled their daily point goal. Proponents of WW love that the system allows flexibility; you can have a cheat meal or eat out with your friends, and simply compensate by changing the "points" you consume for the rest of the day.

#GoWeightWatchers

Plus, WW is nothing if not a support system. The program hinges on meetings and online communities where members can discuss their victories, failures and everything in between. Check out this exchange between two Reddit users on their WW experience. 

I know there are a ton of lifetime members that come and go with varying degrees of success, but I'm curious to hear if anyone has been following ww and maintaining for a long period of time? This is the least 'diet'-y weight loss program I've ever followed and I prefer it to calorie counting. From previous forays into losing weight, I know I won't keep it off if I don't track in some form, so I was planning to stick with WW even once I achieve lifetime. As much as the prospect of tracking forever kinda sucks, I'd prefer it to gaining 35 pounds again! I also know the ww program itself has changed many times over the years, I'm curious to hear if anyone is following any of the older plans still, and how has your success been?
I lost 117lbs in 2009 and have kept it off since. I still go to my meeting every week and weigh in. I've found over the years that is the only way I can stay at goal.

This type of support characterizes the WW program. Plus, with time comes experience and experimentation, which means Weight Watchers everywhere can enjoy a plethora of recipes from fellow dieters (and if tater tot breakfast casserole or dark chocolate oatmeal cookies don't make your mouth water, then maybe this diet isn't for you!), making this program both realistic and fun.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Best diet for 2019: Atkins or Weight Watchers?
#GoAtkinsDiet
A festive crown for the winner
#GoWeightWatchers