Do we need to change the way we talk about alcohol? | The Tylt

Do we need to change the way we talk about alcohol?

You've seen the T-shirts: "rosé all day," "you had me at merlot," "red, white, and booze." It seems millennials have decided to display their love for drinking all over social media as well as on their bodies. Some think that jokes and memes about alcohol are shifting perceptions, sending the message that alcohol is needed to survive average 21st-century woes. Others say, it's all in good fun and there's no need to be concerned. What do you think?

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do we need to change the way we talk about alcohol?
#ChangeBoozeConvo
A festive crown for the winner
#JokesAreFine
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Do we need to change the way we talk about alcohol?
#ChangeBoozeConvo
#JokesAreFine
#ChangeBoozeConvo

According to some, the conversation about alcohol has gone from attending occasional social outings and happy hours to glorifying over-drinking. According to Erin Shaw Street—the founder of a community aimed at creating a "healthier" conversation around alcohol—regular drinking is trivialized in pop culture and media. As a result, people of all ages are constantly exposed to the message that drinking whenever they want is okay, and even encouraged.

The modern psyche takes things like a glass of wine in the evening and jokes that it should be a bottle. Over-exaggerations are now commonplace, and their satirical nature is lost as a result. 

#JokesAreFine

Others say the conversation around alcohol has shifted in a positive way—alcohol abuse is decreasing in millennials and Gen Z when compared to older generations.

According to some researchers, drunkenness has lost it's cool factor. Young people are still drinking, but they aren't going out on benders in the same way you see in movies. The Telegraph's Laura Donnelly reported:

Researchers said the findings, published in the journal BMC Public Health, suggested that norms around alcohol drinking appeared to be changing among younger generations.
Dr Linda Ng Fat, lead author of the study, said: "The increase in young people who choose not to drink alcohol suggests that this behaviour maybe becoming more acceptable, whereas risky behaviours such as binge drinking may be becoming less normalised."
The study suggests fewer people are drinking harmful amounts.

Jokes, memes and exaggerations clearly are not giving young people a false-confidence when it comes to how much they can drink safely.

#ChangeBoozeConvo

But jokes around alcohol have increased in popularity. Particularly when it comes to wine and women, the running joke is that no one can live without their juice. 

Wives, mothers, college students, young professionals–apparently if you're a female and you fit into any of these categories, you can't get through the day without a whole bottle of wine or a couple shots of tequila. The message that this sends to kids–boys and girls–inspires addictive behavior and makes alcohol dependence seem like a cute personality trait. 

The Washington Post's Kimberly Kindy and Dan Keating reported:

In this new strain of advertising, women’s liberation equaled heavy drinking, and alcohol researchers say it both heralded and promoted a profound cultural shift: Women in America are drinking far more, and far more frequently, than their mothers or grandmothers did, and alcohol consumption is killing them in record numbers.
#JokesAreFine

Even so, when it comes to alcohol consumption, it depends on where you look. Beer sales have been taking a significant hit among millennials.

Some studies report that in addition for a shifting preference from beer to other spirits, many millennials choose to replace drinking altogether with smoking weed. ForbesThomas Pellechia reported: 

Anticipating marijuana legalization in California, the marijuana company OutCo partnered with Monocle Research to survey the alcohol/marijuana landscape. It turns out 51 percent of survey participants planned to replace alcohol with cannabis, and about one-third of them said beer would have to go. 

As weed becomes more commonplace, it's likely that this trend will continue. The conversation around drinking may be shifting, but as drinking habits decrease, it's clear that millennials are not drinking more heavily because of it.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do we need to change the way we talk about alcohol?
#ChangeBoozeConvo
A festive crown for the winner
#JokesAreFine