Is there a war on Christmas? | The Tylt

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Culture
Is there a war on Christmas?
#XmasWarIsReal
A festive crown for the winner
#WhatXmasWar

For many, Christmas season is the best time of the year. But as Americans lean into politically-correct behavior, some feel the spirit of Christmas has suffered as a result. For this group, actions that make Christmas an inclusive holiday for all religious groups are seen as an attack on Christianity. Others think the idea of a "war on Christmas" is absurd, and people who believe in it are blowing things out of proportion. Does the war on Christmas really exist?

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Is there a war on Christmas?
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According to President Trump, the war on Christmas is real and even a direct threat. In addition to wanting to make America "great" again, Trump also wants citizens to say "Merry Christmas" again. 

According to The Washington Post, Trump "vowed" to end the war on Christmas during the 2017 holiday season: 

Gone were the 'Season's Greetings' that the Obama family placed on their Christmas cards. The Trump family's official Christmas card reads: 'Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.' The dominant color scheme is an old-school red, green and gold. And the official hashtag? #WHChristmas.
#WhatXmasWar

But for many Christians and non-Christians, the idea that American culture is waging a war against Christmas is absurd. In reality, claims of the war on Christmas reflect the privileged and dominant position Christians hold in American society. 

Actions that make Christmas a more inclusive, cultural holiday, rather than a religious one, are seen as attacks on Christianity because this particular group is so accustomed to being in power. 

The Week's Paul Waldman explains: 

Some Christians felt that [the war on Christmas] represented something being taken away from them, which it does. Their position of cultural dominance was undercut, so that when they walked through the department store door, their culture wasn't given a privileged place. Instead, they'd be no more or less important than anyone else.
The War on Christmas is a way of telling that story in a different way. In a war you can be the oppressed, a victim, even a martyr. But you can also become a hero. It takes the mundane activities of your day, like getting a cup of coffee at Starbucks, and lends them a profound drama and import.
But the truth is that Christmas is doing just fine. All the stores and offices will be closed that day, Christmas trees will still dot the land, and the voices of carolers will rise to the heavens. And even now, you can still get your package of 'Christmas Blend' coffee at Starbucks. Just like Jesus intended.
#XmasWarIsReal

For some, the war on Christmas is not about the holiday becoming more inclusive; it's about the materialism that has overrun the Christmas season. The true enemy is not the cultural pervasiveness of Christmas, but its own celebrants' desire for more. HuffPost's Zach Hunt writes:

When we reduce Christmas to an ideological marketing battle, the very foundation of this holiest of days is dismantled and the humility and solidarity which define it are replaced with pride and exclusion, arrogance and condemnation.
By turning Christmas into a battle over ideology and marketing, we–not Starbucks or Target or anybody else–strip this holiest of days of the very significance we’re claiming to defend.
#XmasWarIsReal

Starbucks has become one of the biggest offenders in the war on Christmas. The chain's plain, red ombre holiday cups in 2015 started a four-year-long battle between conservative Christians and the rest of America's coffee drinkers, with the former group claiming Starbucks was intentionally suppressing Christian symbology. 

Eater lays out each year's controversy. After immense backlash from the 2015 cups: 

...Starbucks foregoes red cups altogether, instead going with a green cup featuring 'a mosaic of more than a hundred people, drawn in one continuous stroke' — 'a symbol of unity,' founder Howard Schultz explained. Somewhat predictably, this cup design leads to a swift backlash from a very vocal group of conservatives, with some claiming the cups are an attack on Christian values.
#WhatXmasWar

Understandably so, for many, the idea that American culture is trying to erase Christmas and its roots is so absurd, the entire concept of a war on Christmas has turned into a running joke. 

#WhatXmasWar
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Is there a war on Christmas?
#XmasWarIsReal
A festive crown for the winner
#WhatXmasWar