Do you prefer charcoal or gas grills? | The Tylt

Do you prefer charcoal or gas grills?

In the era of shelter-at-home orders, backyard cookouts are set to dominate Memorial Day plans. They’ll add a much-needed flavor and variety to life. And maybe you can wave at your neighbors from the backyard. That's kind of social. Depressing stuff aside, any time the sun shines and there’s meat (or veggies!) to cook, the age-old question arises: Do you use a charcoal or gas grill?

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Culture
Do you prefer charcoal or gas grills?
A festive crown for the winner
#CharcoalIsKing
#GasGrillingIsKing
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Real-time Voting
Do you prefer charcoal or gas grills?
#CharcoalIsKing
#GasGrillingIsKing
#CharcoalIsKing

The advantages of charcoal can all be summed up in one word: flavor. Setting aside arguments of lump or briquette, lighter fluid or chimney starter, the fact remains that the smoke makes food taste better. It tastes like a grill, not an outdoor stove, which is all that gas grills are, really. You can vary the flavor with wood such as hickory or mesquite. As opposed to, you know…gas flavor. Also, you can purchase a nice little grill, a big bag of charcoal and everything you need to get going for less than a hundred bucks. Gas grills sell in the hundreds, if not thousands, for a top-of-the-line model. 

#GasGrillingIsKing

Charcoal is messy, dangerous and hard to regulate. The biggest advantage of a gas grill is control. It takes less time, makes far less mess, and you can get the exact temperature you need. Studies have shown that while wood fires may create flavorful smoke, contrary to popular opinion, the gas used in grilling doesn’t leave behind a gas flavor. It’s just the true taste of meat and vegetables, and the smoke of rendered fat. And yes, some gas grills can get up there in cost, but it’s easy to find affordable models for less than two hundred that do a great job. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do you prefer charcoal or gas grills?
A festive crown for the winner
#CharcoalIsKing
#GasGrillingIsKing