Would you try CBD coffee? | The Tylt

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Would you try CBD coffee?
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CBD coffee takes the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, cannabidiol, and infuses it into lattes. The drink is gaining popularity in trendy coffee shops around the country. CBD can reduce anxiety, and proponents of CBD coffee say the drink gives a caffeine boost without the jitters. Others are more skeptical. Some doctors worry about regulating each CBD dosage and even more say the result of a calming, sleep-inducing agent with coffee will just make drinkers groggy. Are you willing to try it?

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According to Conscious Lifestyle Magazine, CBD acts as an anti-inflammatory, can reduce anxiety and stress, and minimizes pain. As a result, CBD products are popping up all over marijuana-friendly areas like New York, Colorado, and California. Regardless of marijuana's legality in a certain state, CBD seems readily available across the country through foods ranging from sundaes to smoothies, and of course, coffee.

Healthline's Melissa Malamut decided to put CBD coffee to the test, reporting that she often suffers from anxiety and typically drinks two to three cups of coffee per day. Malamut drank CBD coffee at least once every day for five days. Three days into her experiment, she reports:

I’m alert with no headache. Caffeine can sometimes give me heart palpitations and shaky hands, but today I feel calm. I don’t feel any anxiety or added stress over deadlines, and the day is flying by.

Malamut found that her dosage of CBD per day did matter. When she had two servings in one morning, the result was an immediate headache and sluggishness. Although Malamut says she wouldn't trade CBD coffee for her regular cup of coffee, the drink received a passing grade for when anyone is in search of some calmness during their morning routine.

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The combination of a calming agent with caffeine is making some wonder whether CBD coffee is actually beneficial or just another trend. High Times, a publication devoted to all things cannabis, even says the concoction is a "liquid contradiction," calling CBD itself "sleep-B-D." Jeremy Glass reports on CBD, saying:

This stuff can stop epileptic seizures, treat Alzheimer’s, fight cancer, relieve pain, reduce information, and chill you out. Now, there’s still a treasure trove of information to find out about CBD, but anyone who’s tried the stuff before—either on its own or paired with THC—knows that it makes you sleepy.

According to Glass, the only things coffee and CBD have in common that they are anti-inflammatories Otherwise, they work in opposition to one another, creating a strange experience for anyone drinking CBD-infused coffee:

At best, it makes you feel weird, like waking up from a nap. It’s a feeling where your body and your brain try to fight each other for dominance and you’re left all logy and confused. You don’t feel relaxed, you don’t feel alert, you just feel like a hunk of fat in clothing.
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Bon Appetit calls CBD the wellness world's new "darling." 

Everyone should take caution when regulating their daily dosages of CBD, particularly if someone is taking it for medical conditions like auto-immune disorders or seizures, versus simply looking for a nutritional boost. With this in mind, some coffee-drinkers report that CBD oil has had a life-changing effect when it comes to reducing other medication:

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Despite the hype, there's little science to prove that CBD (whether infused in coffee or not) can actually provide the benefits people hope for when ingested. Vox's Dan Nosowitz looks to Esther Blessing, a professor at NYU who performs and reviews clinical trials on CBD’s effectiveness, for insight:

Ingesting — think CBD lattes, edibles, or just a drop of oil on the tongue — is likely much less effective than inhaling, says Blessing. When CBD-containing oil is ingested, it wants to join the other fat in your body; most of the CBD taken this way will just stay in that fat, inert and never getting to the brain. When inhaled, CBD bypasses the digestive system, which wants to store fat.

According to Eric Baron of the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, there is also a "huge void" of research when it comes to the proper dosage of CBD. Even the brains behind Flower Power Coffee Co., which sells CBD-infused coffee, admit the science behind their products is shaky: 

“I’ve got to be really careful what I say when it comes to preaching about benefits that CBD can bring,” says Richard Roocroft, the vice president of global sales and marketing for Flower Power. “We just say, have a cup of coffee once a day to keep the doctor away.” I ask about his dosage and whether he has information indicating it has any effect. “To answer your question, ‘Do we have the studies?’ No. We have nothing that would support that,” he tells me.

Nosowitz's reporting certainly makes the case that CBD-infused products are nothing more than a scam. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Would you try CBD coffee?
A festive crown for the winner
#GiveMeCBDCoffee
#NoCBDCoffee