Can you trust people who don’t read books? | The Tylt

Can you trust people who don’t read books?
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In an age of lightning-fast access to information, the physical act of reading may seem ponderously slow. There’s something to be said, however, for the deliberate act of deep immersion in information that only a book can provide. People who read books regularly wonder how the non-bookish even function. Can you trust non-readers?

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Can you trust people who don’t read books?
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Director John Waters famously advised against intimacy with people who don’t own books. Of course, plenty of people would feel the same about hooking up with anyone with a mustache like his. 

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Reading a book, a physical book in your physical hands, is a neurological experience distinct from reading on a screen or being told info. It’s also a means to slow down from the manic pace of a world made of tweets and clickbait, taking time to really know something. 

Readers gain a breadth of knowledge that rapid-fire info sources cannot provide. Though all of this is known, there are people (not counting anyone with a learning disability, of course) who choose not to read books. To readers, these people might as well be aliens.  

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Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. So the more you read on screens, the more your mind shifts towards "non-linear" reading — a practice that involves things like skimming a screen or having your eyes dart around a web page. 
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In our phones and home computers, we have direct access to a wealth of information and interaction never before seen in human history. What does it matter that the info doesn’t come from dead trees

The outdated fetishizing of books ignores issues of space, expense, and expedience in favor of didactic elitism and self-congratulation. You don’t need books to gain knowledge

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One might argue that literacy is unalloyedly a good thing – yes, I can think of counter-examples, but then again one always can – but it is pretty clear to me that reading, as in reading of literature, is not. What we read can affect us vitally, penetrate, stimulate and inform us, but not always in the right ways, or at the right times, or about the right things.
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Can you trust people who don’t read books?
A festive crown for the winner
#BooksAreBest
#BooksAreOverrated
You don't need fewer books; you need better storage
Buy now