Are psychedelic drugs actually good for you?
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Are psychedelic drugs actually good for you?

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The federal government banned psychedelic drugs such as LSD in the late 1960s, declaring they had no medical use and high potential for abuse. But the New York Times reports psychedelics "are undergoing a renaissance." In the past, these drugs were considered promising treatments for a broad range of psychological and psychiatric conditions, and some health experts cite evidence that they can treat depression, anxiety, and addiction. Could psychedelics actually be good for you? 🍄

THE VOTES ARE IN!
#PsychedelicsHelp
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#TrippingIsDangerous
43.2%

Renowned author Michael Pollan speaks strongly in favor of the therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs. Like so many other substances, psychedelics were unfairly demonized by conservative politicians and law enforcement, when they offer enormous potential for healing.

Psychedelic therapy, whether for the treatment of psychological problems or as a means of facilitating self-exploration and spiritual growth, is undergoing a renaissance in America. 

But drugs are still drugs, and many say psychedelics, like alcohol and nicotine, can be extremely dangerous and should be monitored. In the studies cited above, the drugs were administered by a doctor in a controlled setting. That's very different from the way many people consume mushrooms or LSD. Just this description alone shows how risky unmonitored use of these substances can be:

Psychedelic drug effects cut off communications between the brain and the body, leaving the mind to expand in awareness and create its own reality. While these drug types do work in different ways, psychedelics disrupt the brain’s chemical pathways, which can be harmful when used on a frequent basis.

But there are risks with taking hallucinogens—serious ones. Frequent users may experience episodes of psychosis, with severely altered perceptions years after they’ve stopped taking the drug. Another common effect of long-term LSD use is recurring “flashbacks.” There's even a name for the condition of having LSD flashbacks: “hallucinogen persisting perception disorder” (HPPD).

"The Doors of Perception," most of the really good Beatles records, Apple Computers—there's mountains of evidence that psychedelics have enormously beneficial effects when used judiciously.

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